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2 edition of Sulfide binding by the blood of the hydrothermal vent tube worm "Riftia pachyptila" found in the catalog.

Sulfide binding by the blood of the hydrothermal vent tube worm "Riftia pachyptila"

Alissa J. Arp

Sulfide binding by the blood of the hydrothermal vent tube worm "Riftia pachyptila"

by Alissa J. Arp

  • 238 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hydrothermal vent animals.

  • Edition Notes

    Photocopy of: Science, vol.219, (1983), pp.293-297.

    Other titlesScience.
    StatementAlissa J. Arp, James J. Childress.
    ContributionsChildress, James J., American Association for the Advancement of Science.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21858240M

    Zal F, Suzuki T, Kawasaki Y, Childress JJ, Lallier FH, Toulmond A () Primary structure of the common polypeptide chain b from the multi-hemoglobin system of the hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila: an insight on the sulfide binding-site. Galapagoksenpartamato (Riftia pachyptila) on yli kaksi metriä pitkäksi kasvava putkimatolaji, joka esiintyy Tyynessä valtameressä, mustien savuttajien läheisyydessä. Galapagoksenpartamato sietää ympäristössään korkeaa lämpötilaa ja korkeita rikkipitoisuuksia. Se on esimerkki ekstremofiilisestä eliölajista. Laji kuvattiin tieteelle vuonna

    a. Excluding H2S by the tubeworm Riftia pachyptila b. Binding sulfide to hemoglobin by the tubeworm Riftia pachyptila c. Having sulfide binding proteins d. Having gill like structures with a low surface area. The detoxification and metabolism of sulfide were studied in three symbiont-contanining invertebrates from the deep-sea hydrothermal vents: the tube worm, Riftia pachyptila; the clam, Calyptogena magnifica; and the mussel, Bathymodiolus thermophilus. Sulfide oxidizing activities, due to specific sulfide oxidase enzymes, were found in all tissues, with the greatest .

    Dense colonies of Riftia pachyptila flourish in a specialized microhabitat within the vent environment. The worms anchor themselves on the rocks where the hydrothermal vent fluid is issuing out into the seafloor. The base of the tube is bathed in hydrothermal fluid enriched in hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, but devoid of oxygen.   Sulfide binding by the blood of the hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila. Science Arp, A.J., J.J. Childress and C.R. Fisher Jr. (). Blood gas transport in Riftia pachyptila. In: The Hydrothermal Vents of the Eastern Pacific: An Overview. Volume 6, edited by M. L. Jones.


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Sulfide binding by the blood of the hydrothermal vent tube worm "Riftia pachyptila" by Alissa J. Arp Download PDF EPUB FB2

The blood of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila Jones contains a sulfide-binding protein that appears to concentrate sulfide from the environment and may function for sulfide transport to the internal endosymbiotic bacteria contained within the coelomic organ, the by:   Specimens of the hydrothermal vent pogonophoran Riftia pachyptila Jones were collected by submersible at a depth of 2 m at the 21°N hydrothermal vent site on the East Pacific Rise (20°50′N, °06′W) in April and May of The worms were maintained in pressurized aquaria for up to 45 d for metabolic studies.

Consumption of O2 was regulated Cited by:   The sulphide-binding protein that occurs in high concentrations in the vascular blood and coelomic fluid of the hydrothermal vent tube-worm Riftia pachyptila Jones is the haemoglobin. Sulphide binding does not occur at the oxygen-binding sites of the haem, but may occur via thiol-disulphide exchange at the interchain disulphide bridges on the by: SUMMARY The sulphide-binding protein that occurs in high concentrations in the vascular blood and coelomic fluid of the hydrothermal vent tube-worm Riftia pachyptila.

Abstract. The giant extracellular hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila is able to transport simultaneously O 2 and H 2 S in the blood from the gills to a specific organ: the trophosome that harbors sulfide-oxidizing endosymbionts.

This vascular HBL-Hb is made of globins from which four globin types. Fig. Sulfide accumulationin A 2 B Riftia pachyptila vascular blood, bovine serum albumin, and human hemoglobin solu-tion.

(A) Riftia pachyptila blood (H) protein concentra- 2 2 tion wasestimated at mg/ E ml, pH ; bovine serum albumin (0) protein concen-with A blood of of the the of the SCIENCE. 2 Riftia pachyptila have no digestive system; instead, they have an organ known as a trophosome. A trophosome is an internal organ found in some tube worms; it is home to bacteria that assist the tube worm in acquiring nutrients.

The trophosome of Riftia pachyptila contains numerous sulfur crystals. Scientists discovered that some animals living near hydrothermal vents, such as the giant tube worm, Riftia pachyptila, have a symbiotic relationship with species of chemosynthetic bacteria, which allows these animals to survive deep in the ocean.

This video is part of the series I Contain Multitudes, hosted by science journalist Ed Yong. Abstract. The blood of the deep-sea, hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila contains a large, extracellular hemoglobin (Hb) that binds sulfide with a high affinity and capacity both in vitro and in vivo (Arp and Childress, ; Arp and Childress, ).

The animal appears to utilize this binding ability to transport sulfide to internal bacterial symbionts that use it as an energy.

The tube-worm Riftia pachyptila, a member of the phylum Vestimentifera, was first discovered living in dense assemblages around the Galapagos hydrothermal vents. Hydrothermal vent communities can inhabit sulfide-rich habitats because of evolution of detoxification mechanism that often involve microbial symbionts.

Detoxification of sulfide through binding to blood-borne components is known in chemosynthetic vestimentiferans and vesicomyid clams and is particularly well characterized for the tube worm. The deep‐sea tube worm Riftia pachyptila Jones possesses a multi‐hemoglobin system with three different extracellular Hbs: two dissolved in the vascular blood, V1 (ca.

3, kDa) and V2 (ca. kDa), and one in the coelomic fluid, C1 (ca. kDa). V1 Hb consists of four heme‐containing, globin chains (b–e) and four linker chains (L1–L4). Riftia pachyptila, the giant deep-sea tube worm, inhabits hydrothermal vents in the Eastern Pacific ocean.

The worms are nourished by a dense population of. A hydrothermal vent is a fissure on the seafloor from which geothermally heated water issues.

Hydrothermal vents are commonly found near volcanically active places, areas where tectonic plates are moving apart at spreading centers, ocean basins, and hotspots.

Hydrothermal deposits are rocks and mineral ore deposits formed by the action of hydrothermal vents. Sulfur Metabolism in Epsilon-Proteobacteria in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal FieldsThe most well known epsilon-Proteobacteria are gastrointestinal pathogens such as Helicobacter and are heterotrophic and do not have inorganic sulfur metabolic pathways.

The genus Wolinella isolated from cattle rumen can reduce elemental sulfur to hydrogen sulfide. The giant extracellular hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila is able to transport simultaneously O(2) and H(2)S in the blood from the gills to a specific organ: the trophosome that harbors sulfide.

1. Introduction. Riftia pachyptila, the giant tubeworm, lives in the extreme and unstable environment at hydrothermal vent sites along the oceanic spreading zones in the Eastern Pacific (Tunnicliffe, ).These habitats are characterized by abundant hydrogen sulfide as well as great variations in temperature, pH, and water chemistry over short time.

The giant extracellular hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila is able to transport simultaneously O(2) and H(2)S in the blood from the.

Title: Sulfide Binding by the Blood of the Hydrothermal Vent Tube Worm Riftia pachyptila Created Date: Z. assimilation, hemoglobin, hydrothermal vents, inorganic nitrogen, nitrate binding, protein, Riftia pachyptila, sulfide-binding, symbionts, tube-worm, tubeworm Abstract: Riftia pachyptila lives in the unstable environment at hydrothermal vent sites along oceanic spreading zones in the Eastern Pacific.

The tubeworm has a symbiosis with. Sulfide binding by the blood of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tube wormRiftia pachyptila. Science, N.Y. – Google Scholar. Arp, A. J. Childress, J. J., Vetter, R. D. (). The sulphide-binding protein in the blood of the vestimentiferan tube-wormRiftia pachyptila.

Detoxification of sulfide through binding to blood-borne components is known in chemosynthetic vestimentiferans and vesicomyid clams and is particularly well characterized for the tube worm Riftia pachyptila (15, 16).Prokaryotic Cells in the Hydrothermal Vent Tube Worm Riftia pachyptila Jones: Possible Chemoautotrophic Symbionts Article (PDF Available) in Science () August with 1, Reads.